22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from [ К чeрту! ] with 70 notes

journeymancreativejournal:

Thomas Hovenden
The Last Moments of John Brown, Detail
 Metropolitan Museum of Art

journeymancreativejournal:

Thomas Hovenden

The Last Moments of John Brown, Detail

 Metropolitan Museum of Art

Source: journeymancreativejournal

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Refúgio with 6 notes

raindropsonroses-65:

(by Olga-65)

raindropsonroses-65:

(by Olga-65)

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Where Do We Go From Here? with 2 notes

rebermem:

(http://img.sharetv.com/shows/standard/lassie.jpg)
The cast of Lassie.
Lassie is an American television series that follows the adventures of a femaleRough Collie dog named Lassie and her companions, human and animal. The show was the creation of producer Robert Maxwell and animal trainer Rudd Weatherwax and was televised from September 12, 1954, to March 24, 1973. The fourth longest-running U.S. primetime television series after The Simpsons, Gunsmoke, and Law & Order, the show chalked up seventeen seasons on CBS before entering first-run syndication for its final two seasons. Initially filmed in black and white, the show transitioned to color in 1965.
(From Wikipedia)

rebermem:

(http://img.sharetv.com/shows/standard/lassie.jpg)

The cast of Lassie.

Lassie is an American television series that follows the adventures of a femaleRough Collie dog named Lassie and her companions, human and animal. The show was the creation of producer Robert Maxwell and animal trainer Rudd Weatherwax and was televised from September 12, 1954, to March 24, 1973. The fourth longest-running U.S. primetime television series after The SimpsonsGunsmoke, and Law & Order, the show chalked up seventeen seasons on CBS before entering first-run syndication for its final two seasons. Initially filmed in black and white, the show transitioned to color in 1965.

(From Wikipedia)

Tagged: dreaming of lassievintage televisiondog heroes

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Refúgio with 53 notes

followthewestwind:

(via Your Morning Call by adamix69)

followthewestwind:

(via Your Morning Call by adamix69)

Source: pixdaus.com

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Refúgio with 63 notes

tall-guys:

Heading towards Ennerdale. on Flickr.

tall-guys:

Heading towards Ennerdale. on Flickr.

Source: tall-guys

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Refúgio with 20 notes

raindropsonroses-65:

(via 500px / Border Collie Maja II by Rene Columbus)

raindropsonroses-65:

(via 500px / Border Collie Maja II by Rene Columbus)

22nd July 2014

Post with 1 note

Dreaming of Lassie, VI

Timmy’s parents, Gramps, and Timmy were still stuck in the well as it was approaching afternoon.

Timmy asked:  “If Lassie really was a girl, do you think she would have saved us by now?”

Timmy’s father rolled his eyes.  Gramps shook his head and then shrugged.

Timmy’s mother bit her lip and stared pointedly across the well.

Tagged: dreaming of lassiedog heroesadventurevintage televisionlassiehumorbrain damage

22nd July 2014

Quote reblogged from Birds on the Brain with 51 notes

At some point the lightness with which we treat Palestinian suffering compared with Jewish suffering needs to be addressed as an urgent moral matter. The United States is committed to human rights, not rights scaled to one’s religious heritage or race.

Understanding The Permanence Of Greater Israel (via azspot)

The U.S. should be committed to human rights. That doesn’t necessarily mean that it is, and both recent and past history would suggest otherwise.

(via dendroica)

Source: dish.andrewsullivan.com

22nd July 2014

Quote reblogged from Historical Nonfiction with 94 notes

In the afternoon there was a dinner at which tediously predictable worthies of New York — John A. Dix, Horace Greeley, and a divine or two — gave speeches. At the close of the tributes, Grant rose and, as he had done in St. Louis more than a year earlier, gave the speech which was to become his trademark. The New York Times report included the response of his audience: ‘I rise only to say I do not intend to say anything. [Laughter] I thank you for your kind words and your hearty welcome. [Applause].’
— Ulysses Grant had a “perfect speech” that he used on several occasions beginning in 1865. From Grant: A Biography (1982), by William S. McFeely: (via historical-nonfiction)

22nd July 2014

Post with 1 note

Dreaming of Lassie, V

It was about the time I reached puberty, my dream continued.  Everyone was still in the well and they were still waiting for Lassie to save them.

“When is Lassie going to have puppies?” Timmy asked the others.

Timmy’s mother looked to Timmy’s father.  Timmy’s father shrugged.

Gramps said: “Lassie isn’t ever going to have puppies.”

“Why not?” Timmy asked.

“Because Lassie isn’t a girl, she’s a boy,” Gramps explained.

“I thought you knew that, Timmy,” Timmy’s father added.

“Haven’t you seen Lassie lift her leg at the mailbox?” Timmy’s mother asked.

“Sure, but I didn’t think anything of it,” Timmy answered.  Gramps shrugged.

“No, Lassie isn’t a girl, she’s a boy,” Timmy’s father repeated.

“Why do we call her Lassie, then?” Timmy asked.

“Because they want everyone who watches us on TV, to think Lassie is a girl,” Timmy’s mother explained.

“Boy collies have richer, fuller coats—and people expect to see a collie with a rich, full coat,” Timmy’s father stated.

“What difference does that make?  If Lassie was a girl, she’d still look like a collie, wouldn’t she?” Timmy asked.  Gramps shrugged.

“You see,” Timmy’s mother said, “if somebody says “Lion”, you picture a lion with a full mane around its neck and head—but that is only the boy lions that look like that.  Girl lions don’t have the mane or whatever it’s called.”

“Well, I don’t see why we call her Lassie if she’s not a girl,” Timmy admonished.  The others shrugged their shoulders.

“So, he’s never going to have puppies?”  Timmy asked.  The others shook their heads in response.

“I feel like an idiot,” Timmy said. 

The others nodded.

Tagged: dreaming of lassiedog heroesadventurelassiedreamsbrain damagehumor

22nd July 2014

Post

Dreaming of Lassie, IV

A couple of weeks later, my dream miraculously picked-up where the other had left off.

Timmy’s mother and father, Gramps, and Timmy were still at the bottom of the well.  They were trying to read while the light held out and they were waiting for Lassie to save them.

“Here’s a recipe for chicken and dumplings we haven’t tried yet,” Timmy’s mother said to Timmy’s father.

“Dumplings,” Timmy’s father answered, dejectedly.  “I’m burnt-out on dumplings.  Why can’t we have scalloped potatoes once in awhile?  They smell so good coming out of the oven and the cheesy sauce tastes so good—and they go with anything.”

“Scalloped potatoes are a lot of work.  Dumplings are easy.  Besides, have you even planted the potatoes yet?”

“I’ve been thinking about it.”

“How many days are they from planting to harvest?”

“I don’t know.  I’m not sure.  You know what would go great with the scalloped potatoes?  String beans.  String beans taste so good with a little butter and garlic…” he said wistfully.

“Have you planted any?” she asked

“I was thinking about it, but then you need the poles and everything for string beans.  I thought I’d keep it simple and just do squash.”

“Setting up poles for string beans isn’t that difficult—and you only have to do it once.  I’ll tell you what,” Timmy’s mother added, “You take The Joy of Cooking—and give me The Farmer’s Almanac.”

They exchanged reading material.

Tagged: dreaming of lassiedog heroesadventuresuspensebrain damagelassiehumor

21st July 2014

Photo reblogged from National Geographic Found with 2,266 notes

natgeofound:

A Native American sends smoke signals in Montana, June 1909.Photograph by Dr. Joseph K. Dixon, National Geographic Creative

natgeofound:

A Native American sends smoke signals in Montana, June 1909.Photograph by Dr. Joseph K. Dixon, National Geographic Creative

21st July 2014

Photoset reblogged from AMERICAN MASTERS | PBS with 1,208 notes

pbsamericanmasters:

the-final-sentence:

Final sentences:

"[Outside the tent the hyena made the same strange noise that had awakened her.] But she did not hear him for the beating of her heart." 
— from “The Snows of Kilimanjaro

"In the early morning on the lake sitting on the stern of the boat with his father rowing, he felt quite sure that he would never die." 
— from “Indian Camp

"He wrote on a while longer now and there was no sign that any of it would ever cease returning to him intact." 
— from The Garden of Eden

"After a while I went out and left the hospital and walked back to the hotel in the rain." 
— from A Farewell to Arms

[“I feel fine,” she said. “There’s nothing wrong with me.] I feel fine.” 
— from Hills Like White Elephants

"He could feel his heart beating against the pine needle floor of the forest." 
— from For Whom the Bell Tolls

[“Oh, Jake,” Brett said, “we could have had such a damned good time together.”
Ahead was a mounted policeman in khaki directing traffic. He raised his baton. The car slowed suddenly pressing Brett against me.
“Yes,” I said.] “Isn’t it pretty to think so?”
— from The Sun Also Rises

"But this is how Paris was in the early days when we were very poor and very happy."
— from A Moveable Feast

"The old man was dreaming about the lions."
— from The Old Man and the Sea

This is amazing! 

Source: the-final-sentence

21st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Nostalgia Eh! with 3,804 notes

Source: batmanrunningawayfromshit

21st July 2014

Photo reblogged from This Isn't What I Ordered with 359 notes

kqedscience:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists"When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.
Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.”

Learn more from NPR.

kqedscience:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

"When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.”
Learn more from NPR.

Source: kqedscience