27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Indy Pendent Thinking with 34 notes

indypendent-thinking:

Storyteller by *pesare

I don’t know if this is what you intended, but I like how the blood from the tree, which turns into new life, suggests that with everything bad in life, there’s something good. That sorrow and despair is part of life, but that there’s always something to come out of it. 
(http://pesare.deviantart.com/art/Storyteller-203938363)

indypendent-thinking:

Storyteller by *pesare

I don’t know if this is what you intended, but I like how the blood from the tree, which turns into new life, suggests that with everything bad in life, there’s something good. That sorrow and despair is part of life, but that there’s always something to come out of it. 

(http://pesare.deviantart.com/art/Storyteller-203938363)

27th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from Black Raincloud with 1,481 notes

huffingtonpost:

Jon Stewart’s Priceless Response To Fox News On Ferguson

Jon Stewart is back from vacation, and he’s not wasting any time going after one of his favorite targets: Fox News.

Watch his the full brilliant 10  minute monologue on racism and Ferguson  here. 

Source: huffingtonpost

27th August 2014

Quote reblogged from Green Turtle Island with 128 notes

As you grow older, you’ll see white men cheat black men every day of your life, but let me tell you something and don’t you forget it - whenever a white man does that to a black man, no matter who he is, how rich he is, or how fine a family he comes from, that white man is trash.

Atticus Finch, Chapter 23, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

(via greenturtleisland)

Source: thatgorgeousarchangel

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Enchanting Photos with 47 notes

bonitavista:

Shinjang, China
photo via dejan

bonitavista:

Shinjang, China

photo via dejan

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Bloody Geddion with 9,345 notes

humansofnewyork:

"A few years ago, I got a call on my cell phone from a twelve year old child from my village. He was calling me from a bus stop. He’d taken a bus into the city alone, and he was calling me to ask if I could help him find a way to go to school. Both of his parents had died of AIDS, and he had no money for tuition. I told him to stay where he was, and left work immediately to pick him up. At first I was very mad at him. He should not have travelled alone. But then I looked at him and I saw myself. I’d also been desperate to go to school after my father was killed, but we had no money. So even though I was suffering myself, I told him I would try to help him. My salary was not enough, so I tried many things to get the money. After work, I went to the landfill to hunt for recyclables. But after I paid to have them cleaned, there was no money left. Now I’m trying to make bricks. I have a small operation in the village to make bricks, and I sell them in the city. It doesn’t make much money, but it’s enough to pay tuition for the boy and three of his siblings.” (Kampala, Uganda)

humansofnewyork:

"A few years ago, I got a call on my cell phone from a twelve year old child from my village. He was calling me from a bus stop. He’d taken a bus into the city alone, and he was calling me to ask if I could help him find a way to go to school. Both of his parents had died of AIDS, and he had no money for tuition. I told him to stay where he was, and left work immediately to pick him up. At first I was very mad at him. He should not have travelled alone. But then I looked at him and I saw myself. I’d also been desperate to go to school after my father was killed, but we had no money. So even though I was suffering myself, I told him I would try to help him. My salary was not enough, so I tried many things to get the money. After work, I went to the landfill to hunt for recyclables. But after I paid to have them cleaned, there was no money left. Now I’m trying to make bricks. I have a small operation in the village to make bricks, and I sell them in the city. It doesn’t make much money, but it’s enough to pay tuition for the boy and three of his siblings.” 

(Kampala, Uganda)

Source: humansofnewyork

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Refúgio with 5 notes

raindropsonroses-65:

Steam train HDR (by Jody Walmsley)

raindropsonroses-65:

Steam train HDR (by Jody Walmsley)

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Refúgio with 24 notes

redwingjohnny:

(via 500px / Bela amarela by Olga)

redwingjohnny:

(via 500px / Bela amarela by Olga)

Source: 500px.com

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Trem das Cores with 52 notes

colin-vian:

  Frits Thaulow (1847-1906) - Cottages by a River

colin-vian:

  Frits Thaulow (1847-1906) - Cottages by a River

Source: colin-vian

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Trem das Cores with 32 notes

pagewoman:

The Apple Orchard : Carl Larsson

pagewoman:

The Apple Orchard : Carl Larsson

Source: pagewoman

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from the world from my hammock with 39 notes

fycharleston:

It’s a Beautiful GardenArt by West Fraser 

fycharleston:

It’s a Beautiful Garden
Art by West Fraser 

Source: westfraserstudio.com

27th August 2014

Link reblogged from knowledge equals black power with 57 notes

In 1864 Maryland, Confusion Over Emancipation Made Slaves Interpreters of Law by Martha Jones →

africandiasporaphd:

In the midst of the Civil War, who was a slave and who was free? When African Americans in Maryland asked this question 150 years ago, in August 1864, they engaged in a sophisticated analysis. The answer was to be found in the confrontations between African Americans, slaveholders, and soldiers. Understanding emancipation required the careful reading of orders, statutes, and presidential edicts. The result was sometimes confusion, even for lawmakers. Judges, congress members, and the President differed over who had the authority to end slavery. Legal pundits suggested that the Constitution might not allow for abolition at all. Enslaved people had a great deal at stake: their liberty. They studied emancipation’s complex legal contours. They interpreted the law. Then, they acted.

Read more about what they did, including Annie Davis’ letter to Abraham Lincoln inquiring about her freedom.

Source: africandiasporaphd

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Refúgio with 18 notes

raindropsonroses-65:

Nuances (by Olga-65)

raindropsonroses-65:

Nuances (by Olga-65)

27th August 2014

Quote reblogged from and another thing ... with 13 notes

But I want to introduce a caveat. I think it is a mistake to simply focus on the militarization of the police and their racist actions in addressing the killing of Michael Brown. What we are witnessing in this brutal killing and mobilization of state violence is symptomatic of the neoliberal, racist, punishing state emerging all over the world, with its encroaching machinery of social death. The neoliberal killing machine is on the march globally. The spectacle of neoliberal misery is too great to deny any more and the only mode of control left by corporate-controlled societies is violence, but a violence that is waged against the most disposable such as immigrant children, protesting youth, the unemployed, the new precariat and black youth. Neoliberal states can no longer justify and legitimate their exercise of ruthless power and its effects under casino capitalism. Given the fact that corporate power now floats above and beyond national boundaries, the financial elite can dispense with political concessions in order to pursue their toxic agendas. Moreover, as Slavoj Zizek argues “worldwide capitalism can no longer sustain or tolerate … global equality. It is just too much.” Moreover, in the face of massive inequality, increasing poverty, the rise of the punishing state, and the attack on all public spheres, neoliberalism can no longer pass itself off as synonymous with democracy. The capitalist elite, whether they are hedge fund managers, the new billionaires from Silicon Valley, or the heads of banks and corporations, is no longer interested in ideology as their chief mode of legitimation. Force is now the arbiter of their power and ability to maintain control over the commanding institutions of American society. Finally, I think it is fair to say that they are too arrogant and indifferent to how the public feels.

Source: truthdig.com

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Birds on the Brain with 247 notes

laboratoryequipment:

Humans were Culturally Diverse Prior to Africa ExodusResearchers have carried out the biggest ever comparative study of stone tools dating to between 130,000 and 75,000 years ago found in the region between sub-Saharan Africa and Eurasia. They have discovered there are marked differences in the way stone tools were made, reflecting a diversity of cultural traditions. The study has also identified at least four distinct populations, each relatively isolated from each other with their own different cultural characteristics.The research paper also suggests that early populations took advantage of rivers and lakes that crisscrossed the Saharan desert. A climate model coupled with data about these ancient water courses was matched with the new findings on stone tools to reveal that populations connected by rivers had similarities in their cultures. This could be the earliest evidence of different populations “budding” across the Sahara, using the rivers to disperse and meet people from other populations, says the paper published in the journal, Quaternary Science Reviews.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/humans-were-culturally-diverse-prior-africa-exodus

laboratoryequipment:

Humans were Culturally Diverse Prior to Africa Exodus

Researchers have carried out the biggest ever comparative study of stone tools dating to between 130,000 and 75,000 years ago found in the region between sub-Saharan Africa and Eurasia. They have discovered there are marked differences in the way stone tools were made, reflecting a diversity of cultural traditions. The study has also identified at least four distinct populations, each relatively isolated from each other with their own different cultural characteristics.

The research paper also suggests that early populations took advantage of rivers and lakes that crisscrossed the Saharan desert. A climate model coupled with data about these ancient water courses was matched with the new findings on stone tools to reveal that populations connected by rivers had similarities in their cultures. This could be the earliest evidence of different populations “budding” across the Sahara, using the rivers to disperse and meet people from other populations, says the paper published in the journal, Quaternary Science Reviews.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/08/humans-were-culturally-diverse-prior-africa-exodus

Source: laboratoryequipment

27th August 2014

Photo reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR with 3,457 notes

thechapterfourblog:

Holy shit.
If that doesn’t put the finest point on it you’ve ever seen/heard, I don’t know what does.

thechapterfourblog:

Holy shit.

If that doesn’t put the finest point on it you’ve ever seen/heard, I don’t know what does.

Source: thedragoninmygarage