31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from [ К чeрту! ] with 106 notes

thorsteinulf:

Spencer Gore - Icknield Way (1912)

thorsteinulf:

Spencer Gore - Icknield Way (1912)

Source: thorsteinulf

31st July 2014

Photoset reblogged from [ К чeрту! ] with 1,574 notes

matteoricci:

John Thomson: Chinese Women, 1869-72.

John Thomson (1837-1921) was a pioneering Scottish photographer who, after traveling through various parts of Asia, settled in Hong Kong in 1868 and operated a studio there for the next four years. Using Hong Kong as his base, he traveled extensively throughout China and was the first known photographer to document the people and landscapes of China for publication in the western market. Returning to England, he published a four volume book entitled “Illustrations of China and its People” in London, 1873-1874.

Images courtesy of Yale University Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Source: matteoricci

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Black American OURstory with 72 notes

wakeupslaves:

Charles E Cobb is a long time African American journalist who participated in the southern freedom movement etween 1962 and 1966. His purpose in writing This Nonviolent Stuff Will Get You Killed is to correct the revisionist “white” view of the 1960s civil rights movement.
The version of the civil rights movement taught in schools and universities is written by white historians who, for the most part, lay out historical events and omit the thinking that led to them. Or even worse, instead of asking movement veterans what they were thinking, offer a retrospective analysis of what they must have been thinking.
It was a problem Frederick Douglass frequently faced in his dealings with white abolitionists. Afraid he would appear “too learned” to be convincing, they told him, “Just give us the facts – we’ll take care of the philosophy.”
One important fact often “whitewashed” out of history is the use of guns in the southern civil rights movement. Guns have always been fundamental to rural life, in both black and white communities. In the 1960s, they were essential for the survival of black farming families – for hunting food, killing varmints in the garden and protecting themselves against terrorist raids by Night Riders and the Ku Klux Klan.
White southerners made it pretty obvious that they were prepared to kill African Americans – and their families – if they registered to vote. Despite his highly publicized use of nonviolence as a tactic, Martin Luther King had bodyguards who carried pistols to protect him. and Fanny Lou Hamer used a shotgun to protect her house against white “crackers.” Armed African American World War II and Korean War veterans – in some areas formally organized as The Deacons for Defense and Justice – carried weapons to protect workers from CORE (Congress of Racial Equality) and SCLC (Southern Christian Leadership Council).
No white people were ever killed by these guards: it was sufficient to convey the message that blacks were willing to defend themselves.
As Cobb points us, no white person is willing to die for white supremacy.
Cobb is a great story teller and sheds important insights about the curious relationship between outside organizers and rural African American farmers as they set about building their trust.
It was my intention to embed Cobb’s 90 minute C-SPAN presentation about his book, but YouTube has censored the video by taking it down. So you have to click on the following link:
http://www.c-span.org/video/?319435-1/guns-civil-rights

wakeupslaves:

Charles E Cobb
is a long time African American journalist who participated in the southern freedom movement etween 1962 and 1966. His purpose in writing This Nonviolent Stuff Will Get You Killed is to correct the revisionist “white” view of the 1960s civil rights movement.

The version of the civil rights movement taught in schools and universities is written by white historians who, for the most part, lay out historical events and omit the thinking that led to them. Or even worse, instead of asking movement veterans what they were thinking, offer a retrospective analysis of what they must have been thinking.

It was a problem Frederick Douglass frequently faced in his dealings with white abolitionists. Afraid he would appear “too learned” to be convincing, they told him, “Just give us the facts – we’ll take care of the philosophy.”

One important fact often “whitewashed” out of history is the use of guns in the southern civil rights movement. Guns have always been fundamental to rural life, in both black and white communities. In the 1960s, they were essential for the survival of black farming families – for hunting food, killing varmints in the garden and protecting themselves against terrorist raids by Night Riders and the Ku Klux Klan.

White southerners made it pretty obvious that they were prepared to kill African Americans – and their families – if they registered to vote. Despite his highly publicized use of nonviolence as a tactic, Martin Luther King had bodyguards who carried pistols to protect him. and Fanny Lou Hamer used a shotgun to protect her house against white “crackers.” Armed African American World War II and Korean War veterans – in some areas formally organized as The Deacons for Defense and Justice – carried weapons to protect workers from CORE (Congress of Racial Equality) and SCLC (Southern Christian Leadership Council).

No white people were ever killed by these guards: it was sufficient to convey the message that blacks were willing to defend themselves.

As Cobb points us, no white person is willing to die for white supremacy.

Cobb is a great story teller and sheds important insights about the curious relationship between outside organizers and rural African American farmers as they set about building their trust.

It was my intention to embed Cobb’s 90 minute C-SPAN presentation about his book, but YouTube has censored the video by taking it down. So you have to click on the following link:

http://www.c-span.org/video/?319435-1/guns-civil-rights

Source: wakeupslaves

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Indy Pendent Thinking with 74 notes

indypendenthistory:

A Marine stands watch in an observation tower as a chaplain holds mass on Hill 950, July 31, 1967

indypendenthistory:

A Marine stands watch in an observation tower as a chaplain holds mass on Hill 950, July 31, 1967

Source: indypendenthistory

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Untitled with 110 notes

catmota:

Gum Blossom
Criss Canning
more works by this artist

catmota:

Gum Blossom

Criss Canning

more works by this artist

Source: catmota

31st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Collection Of World Best Photos with 3 notes

31st July 2014

Quote reblogged from brown dress with white dots with 140 notes

Smells are unlike any other memories. They remain with us fully 100% forever on some remote desert island of the mind where they keep the lowest profile. If they’re not shaken awake by something, they lay silent and still like sleeping dogs under the table. But once roused, they return as completely as the moment we first encountered them.
— Jonathan Carroll (via browndresswithwhitedots)

30th July 2014

Photo reblogged from BEAU LOVEROE with 869,796 notes

beauloveroe:

xanush:
Show you care & Reblog. Real talk …

beauloveroe:

xanush:

Show you care & Reblog. Real talk …

Source: charitywaterproject

30th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Nostalgia Eh! with 300 notes

greeneyes55:

Picadilly  Circus London 1947 
Photo:  Marcel Bovis 

greeneyes55:

Picadilly  Circus London 1947 

Photo:  Marcel Bovis 

Source: greeneyes55

30th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Indigo Dreams with 17 notes

indigodreams:

"The Wissa Wassef Art School", 1984, by Mohamed Mousa (born 1945). Country of Origin: Egypt. Date/Period: Contemporary 1984. Place of Origin: Harrania. Size: 3.60m x 2.50m Credit Line: Werner Forman Archive/ Ramses Wissa Wassef Art Centre.

indigodreams:

"The Wissa Wassef Art School", 1984, by Mohamed Mousa (born 1945). Country of Origin: Egypt. Date/Period: Contemporary 1984. Place of Origin: Harrania. Size: 3.60m x 2.50m Credit Line: Werner Forman Archive/ Ramses Wissa Wassef Art Centre.

30th July 2014

Photo reblogged from The Wave with 58 notes

gentlewave:

Sybil Andrews (1898-1992): The Mowers, 1937, linocut in four colours, printed in raw sienna, red, viridian and Chinese blue on buff oriental laid tissue, 29.2 x 35.2 cm, private collecton, source: art.findartinfo.com.

gentlewave:

Sybil Andrews (1898-1992): The Mowers, 1937, linocut in four colours, printed in raw sienna, red, viridian and Chinese blue on buff oriental laid tissue, 29.2 x 35.2 cm, private collecton, source: art.findartinfo.com.

30th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Historical Nonfiction with 428 notes

historical-nonfiction:

For millenia the Great Sphinx would be “rediscovered” only to be covered again, as the desert sands shifted. Today it is protected as best as humans can from the encroaching dunes.

historical-nonfiction:

For millenia the Great Sphinx would be “rediscovered” only to be covered again, as the desert sands shifted. Today it is protected as best as humans can from the encroaching dunes.

29th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Trem das Cores with 28 notes

art-and-things-of-beauty:

Georg Rueter (Dutch, 1875-1966) - Still life with Dahlias, oil on canvas, 85 x 64,5 cm. 1958.

art-and-things-of-beauty:

Georg Rueter (Dutch, 1875-1966) - Still life with Dahlias, oil on canvas, 85 x 64,5 cm. 1958.

Source: art-and-things-of-beauty

29th July 2014

Photo reblogged from Nostalgia Eh! with 132 notes

bigthingscomeinblueboxes:

Female Motorcycle Police 1927

bigthingscomeinblueboxes:

Female Motorcycle Police 1927

Source: bigthingscomeinblueboxes

29th July 2014

Quote reblogged from Bloody Geddion with 41 notes

Ideas of pure White womanhood that were created to defend women of the homeland required a corresponding set of ideas about hot-blooded Latinas, exotic Suzy Wongs, wanton jezebels, and stoic native squaws. Civilized nation-states required uncivilized and backward colonies for their national identity to have meaning, and the status of women in both places was central to this entire endeavor.

Patricia Hill Collins (via the-uncensored-she)

Exactly. That’s why I cringe whenever I see Phaedra Parks play up her “Southern Belle” status on RHOA. Or any historically unaware Black woman, for that matter; southern born and raised or not. Its so historically wrong artificial and pretentious; that “carricature” of womanhood was a trope invented by antibellum crackers that NEVER applied to Black women, but only meant to highlight how refined southern white women were IN COMPARISON TO the ‘brutish Black female.’ And that Scarlett O’hara act was fake even for cracker women back then, who were all too eager to live up to the fiction, since their white men treated them as little more than fancy decorations around the house. They had nothing else to lord over Black women but that dumb Southern Belle affectation. Did she not learn that in her college African American history/feminism courses???

(via blackourstory)

Source: the-uncensored-she